Taraneh Hemami

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Iranian artist Taraneh Hemami is a visual artist based in San Francisco, California. Her larger body of work explores the complex cultural politics of exile through personal and collective projects. Her work has been exhibited at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Intersection for the Arts, Luggage Store (all San Francisco), Victoria and Albert Museum (London), Beirut Exhibition Center (Lebanon), and Sharjah Art Museum (Sharjah, United Arab Emirates), among other venues.

Hemami first collaborated with Invisible Venue in 2013 to present the site-specific work, Bullet Points, at the invitation of curator Leile Grothe and EMERGENCY USA | Thoreau Center for Sustainability in the Presidio of San Francisco. www.taranehhemami.com

Artist Statement

The first iteration this work, originally titled Bullet Points 2013, was a site-specific installation produced in collaboration with Invisible Venue for The Open Moment, an exhibition that considered the social, economic, personal, and political ramifications of conflict. Presented as a series of window overlay panels, creating stained glass-like sunlit refractions, Bullet Points presented visual data about casualties in the American conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, contrasted with visual data from one year of the American gun violence epidemic. The installation occupied an arterial corridor at the Thoreau Center for Sustainability, situated in the former Letterman Army Medical Center circa 1890 at the historic Presidio of San Francisco. The Open Moment was jointly presented by the Thoreau Center for Sustainability, a network of nonprofit organizations engaged in social justice issues, and EMERGENCY USA, a nonprofit organization that provides medical relief for civilian victims of war and poverty in conflict zones around the world. The Open Moment was organized by independent curator Leila Grothe.

About this Article

This article was originally created as part of SOMArts Cultural Center's Making a Scene: 50 Years of Alternative Bay Area Spaces. To learn how to add or edit content please visit the Bay Area Society for Art & Activism's online History Collection Lab.

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